KG-Bamboo Women's Sleeveless 21 - EMU DREAMING

$49.00 $53.50

SKU: KG-E2108 Kingston Grange

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Artist: SARAH-JANE NAMPIJINPA SINGLETON

PAINTING STORY

Yankirri Jukurrpa (Emu Dreaming) – Ngarlikirlangu

This painting depicts a ‘yankirri Jukurrpa’ (emu [Dromaius novaehollandiae] Dreaming) from a place called Ngarlikurlangu, approximately 50kms north of Yuendumu. The ‘kirda’ (owners) of this Dreaming are Nangala/Nampijinpa women and Jangala/Jampijinpa men. This Jukurrpa tells the story of a ‘yankirri’ (emu) and a ‘wardilyka’ (bush turkey [Ardeotis australis]). ‘Yankirri’ lived at a soakage to the west called Warnirripanu (or Walangkamirirri), while ‘wardilyka’ lived at a soakage to the east called Parirri. The emu and bush turkey used to go around the country picking ‘yakajirri’ (bush raisins [Solanum centrale]) and mashing them into ‘kapurdu’ (fruit balls) to save in their nests for later. However, they were jealous of each other; the emu thought that the bush turkey was picking the best and juiciest ‘yakajirri’, and was leaving him with only the sour ‘yakajirri’. The emu went to the bush turkey’s nest to the east while the bush turkey was out hunting and smashed up the ‘kapurdu’ that the bush turkey had saved there. When the bush turkey returned, he found his smashed ‘yakajirri’ balls and realized that the emu had destroyed them. He went to the west to confront the emu and when he found him, they got into a big fight. The bush turkey eventually flew away to the north, leaving behind the smashed ‘yakajirri’ balls. This practice of making ‘kapurdu’ (fruit balls) is a traditional Warlpiri method of storing ‘yakajirri’; in the old days, people used to dry the ‘yakajirri’, grind them up with a rock in a coolamon, mix them with water and form balls from them, and cover the ‘kapurdu’ with red ochre so they would keep. Today at Ngarlikirlangu we can see round, red rocks which are the ‘kapurdu’ that the emu smashed up. There is also a dance for this ‘yankirri’ (emu) Jukurrpa that is performed during mens’ initiation ceremonies. A number of other Jukurrpa are also located at Ngarlikirlangu, including ‘wardilyka Jukurrpa’ (bush turkey Dreaming), ‘yardijiinypa Jukurrpa’ (meat ant Dreaming), and ‘pirntina Jukurrpa’ (woma or Ramsay’s python [Aspidites ramsayi] Dreaming). Lots of ‘yakajirri’ grow around the Ngarlikirlangu area today. In contemporary Warlpiri paintings, traditional iconography can be used to represent the Jukurrpa, associated sites, and other elements. ‘Yankirri’ are usually represented by arrow-like shapes depicting their ‘wirliya’ (footprints) as they walk around.

SOFT: Bamboo fibre is softer than the softest cotton, has a natural sheen to the surface and feels similar to silk or cashmere.

PROTECTIVE: Bamboo fibre clothing is naturally anti-microbial that requires no finish treatment with harmful chemicals. Bamboo apparel is comfortable, thermal regulating that will keep the body cooler, drier, warmer.

HYPOALLERGENIC: Bamboo's organic and natural properties make it non-irritating so perfect for extra sensitive skin.

Antibacterial: Naturally and continuously antibacterial, staying fresh and odour free for longer.

Fabric:  65% Bamboo Fibre / 35% Cotton

Laundry Care
  • Wash before use(will shrink a little bit)
  • Warm machine
  • Wash dark colour separately
  • Do not bleach
  • Do not tumble dry (Shrink very much)
  • Cool Iron on reverse side of print
  • Do not dry clean
  • *Note: Not recommended to drip dry in the sun, It may be heat and shrink. (Especially summer)
    Colours may vary slightly from the image.